Belonging in Community – Workshop Experiential

Reflecting on what makes people feel they really belong to a place, so that they treat it well and care for the way it flourishes, a sense of belonging to their community comes high on the list. If alienation has negative effects on people’s inner, personal lives (as discussed here), it is even more damaging in terms of our relationships with each other. More people live in cities now than ever before; more people live alone now than ever before; and more people report suffering from mental health issues associated with feeling alone and being cast aside by an unfeeling society than ever before. The link is lack of community; someone to check in on you if they sense you feeling down; someone to lend a hand when you are struggling, as well as celebrate your victories; someone to talk to about whatever is happening. What has too often gone missing is a range of people who actually care. And this works, in an ecosystemic sense, because those people know that if something is wrong with one member of a community it will spread to others; and that all of us are involved with each other, in the end.

 Fixing thatched roof

 

American writer on the ecological spirituality of Mayan village life, Martin Prechtel, claimed once that communal life is over when people don’t have to get together to help mend each other’s roofs. With tin or cement tiles over our heads, we don’t have to care about the home next door; if we both relied upon thatch, which had to be renewed each season, we’d be forced to remain on better terms. And And Martin Shaw, resident myth teller at Schumacher College in Devon, England, and leader of wilderness retreats designed to get participants back in touch with the powers of nature, points out that community also includes ancestors past and elders present, those that touched our hearts and minds, whether they be ancient sages or rock stars, poets or cranky neighbours. Electronic social media today presents us with an unparalleled opportunity to tap into a ‘community of souls,’ no matter what we are into. Not only can we choose friends from a local group nowadays, but we can link up with those who share our interests anywhere in the world. And sharing tales around a campfire in suburban Thornbury the other night, I once again heard people tell of their ‘longing for belonging’ and an associated yearning to connect more deeply with others; in other words, to grow community.

shutterstock_59945146-campfire

 

This leads me to the next aspect of the Belonging workshop; grounding ourselves in each other’s company, in a way that consolidates the ecomythic aspect of our relationships as part of a sacred earth community. This experiential combines deep listening with ‘story stick’ telling, as each of us is given space to share with the group our most cherished hopes for community, so that – at least for those few hours and in the way we carry them onwards in our hearts – we do in fact form that community of deep listening and allow it to inform our souls. When it is consolidated with reflections from the mythic realm, this sharing of care can become a rich response to our yearning for a community that sustains soul. Ecomythic belonging nourishes us beyond our personal cares and even beyond human bias. It replaces us in a biodiverse ecosystem of physical and symbolic beings and more-than-human powers.

 

The author of White Fella Dreaming, Dr Geoffrey Berry, presents Belonging workshops that work across three levels; the personal, communal, and ecomythic aspects of feeling more deeply at home on earth. The first is to be held at CERES Environmental Park in Brunswick East on Saturday 10th October. For more information visit belonging.org.au/news and you can book here.

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